Adventures in Lisbon with the friendliest explorers

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On the back streets of Alfama

My experience in Lisbon had been of a rather curious nature. A lot more random and distressing things happened to me there than in any other place (apart from Brussels trip, on which my companion and I met an apparently famous flutist, an old British womanizer type, and proceeded to go for drinks with him and his very strange mate).

For starters, I became enamored with soft toned buildings and laundry hanging off every window. When I was in Alfama visiting the Castelo de Sao Jorge, I counted 22+ drying sets of laundry seen in every direction.

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The houses of Bairro Alto

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Alfama streets

Cobbled paths were a bit of a challenge with a carry-on suitcase though.

I talked to and met a lot of Portuguese people, starting with Regina, my very warm and friendly AirBnB host (check out her Bairro Alto room for rent here) and continuing with her Ukrainian roommate (what a pleasant surprise, we spoke Russian most of the time), her boyfriend, friends, mother and random people Regina and I met on the street.

One of the most striking features about Lisbon (and I assume, Portugal overall) is how friendly everyone was. Portuguese are a warm bunch. They are also proud of their heritage, cultural contributions, naval achievements and geographic discoveries.

When I saw the river Tagus view from the hills of the city (Lisbon is nicknamed as the City of Seven Hills), there was no question about it: If I had to see this all my life, I, too, would want to set sail and explore the world on ship. So hats off to the Portuguese for venturing out on our behalf. Are you not surprised that Lisboa’s other nickname is Queen of the Sea?

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View from Alfama; river Tagus in the background

I arrived at the cusp of November and December and, despite the sun on photos, it was pretty cold there. But I didn’t give up. I took a cable car to Alfama to explore the Sao Jorge castle and surrounding areas. Of particular interest was the Conserveira de Lisboa, which has been in operation for 80 years. It’s full of bespoke canned seafood products, and you can watch old ladies wrap sardines, octopus and other goodies in beautifully designed wraps (which I’m going to put on my wall as art pieces):

Source: Lisboa Diarios http://lisboadiarios.blogspot.com/

I recommend taking a small picnic to the Castle and surrounding grounds so you can enjoy breathtaking views without going hungry or thirsty. I also recommend overcoming any fears of heights and climb as many stairs as you can to experiencing what it might have felt like to be a arrow-shooting guard on duty.

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Took me a while to wait for the flag to move. This is from the castle’s highest point.

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About to enter the Castelo de Sao Jorge. Notice a figure eyeing us from the top.

I did not go into as many restaurants as I usually do when I travel, but one particular spot that stood out was The Decadente, which recently won a Best Restaurant award. Rightly so. Make a reservation and definitely try the pork belly on the menu. More photos can be found here.

Why are all these photos taken with what looks like a film camera? Sadly, my iPhone 4S was stolen by a pickpocket. My guard was down, I was too distracted in a busy cafe (at A Padaria Portuguesa, you might want to be more careful there), and someone took it. It was one of the most unpleasant feelings in my life. I won’t go into my feelings about the loss, but I’ll say that it me a day to regroup and equip myself with paper maps and disposable cameras!

On a Monday night, my last one in Lisboa, Regina took me out to have some of the best traditional Portuguese meat at Toma La Da Ca restaurant in Bica neighborhood. Cheap and plentiful food. We then ventured out to a Library Bar (one of the few bars that allow smoking indoors – take note, smokers) to meet up with friends before heading to an amateur drag queen night, some of which you can see below:

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Things you must do in Lisbon as recommended by me:

  • Stay in Bairro Alto, which is a nightlife central; it’s densely packed, all you need is within the perimeter of 4 streets.
  • Dine at El Decadente restaurant.
  • Have pastries for breakfast and do not overestimate the freshness of seafood shops. I found excellent cod and octopus salads at a seafood shop on Rua Loreto near the Largo Luis de Camoes square in Chiado.
  • Venture out to Belem for a day: see the Jeronimos Monastery, get your contemporary art fix at the Berardo Collection Museum, and stuff yourself with the tasty Pasteis de Belem, like myself over here:
  • If you are into dancing, go to LUX Fragil club; it’s co-owned by John Malkovich and even though the club is not new, it is still high on the list of excellent interior design jobs.
  • Catch some fado especially at dinner. But try to avoid tourist traps as they will overcharge you.

Few more shots:

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Tower of Belem

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Jeronimos Monastery in Belem

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Electricity Museum in Belem. Great contemporary art exhibits!

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Padrão dos Descobrimentos, or Monument to the Discoveries. Belem

Any questions? Just ask 🙂

All photos copyright Karin Abramova

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5 thoughts on “Adventures in Lisbon with the friendliest explorers

  1. Thanks for stopping by my blog ~ gave me a chance to link back to yours. Sorry to hear about your phone but love your attitude of moving forward (despite what I would imagine to be rather bitter feelings about the incident). And your disposal camera photos are fabulous!! The colors are so bright and pretty ~ I was going to ask what settings you used until I read it was disposable!

    • Thanks for the visit and for the feedback! Indeed, it was really, really debilitating not to have the phone, the camera and the map (!) at first, but I think the whole incident just made me appreciate the current moment instead of curling up behind the lens and instagramming it all nonstop, you know?

  2. I am not from Lisbon or any other city in Portugal. I am indeed very Portuguese I was born In Sao Miguel Island in the Atlantic Ocean. Living most of my life on the east coast of USA I don’t consider myself to be truly Portuguese my ac sent is just about left me because the only person I have to speak Portuguese with is my mother. I don’t know why but the majority of the Portuguese people who immigrate to the US seem embarrass of our language which I believe to be one of the world’s best. I loved reading you’re article about your visit and all your adventures I wish more people would take note of who the Portuguese people rely are. Also realize that we are not from South America, or a Provence of Spain. In fact we are one of Europe’s oldest countries, and birthplace to so many wonderful beginnings and legends that truly lived. thank you! :0)

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